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Latina Women Will Finally Earn The Same As White Men

Last updated on September 15, 2020

There are limited studies about breast cancer in Hispanic/Latina women, but that is beginning to change, and more information about breast cancer in this population is becoming available. Between 2000 and 2017, the rate of imprisonment in state and federal prisons declined by 55% for black women, while the rate of imprisonment for white women rose by 44%. Hispanic women were imprisoned at 1.3 times the rate of white women (67 vs. 49 per 100,000).

Subsequently, the U.S Congress passed Public Law in 1976, mandating the collection of information about U.S. residents of Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central American, South American and other Spanish-speaking country origins. Census Bureau to create a broader category that encompassed all people who identified having roots from these countries.

For Mexican and Costa Rican women in particular, life in the United States represents a significant shift in opportunities for family life, as higher wages allow women the ability to be more autonomous. In a 2013 Nielson study in the United States, Latinas said they were primary or joint decision makers in the household, giving input in categories such as grocery shopping, insurance, financial services, electronics, and family care.

Poverty rates for Latina women, at 27.9 percent, are close to triple those of white women, at 10.8 percent. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 32.2 percent of Latina women work in the service sector, compared with only 20 percent of white women, and service workers are almost 20 percent less likely to have either paid sick leave or retirement benefits. Graduation rates for Latinas were at 31.3 percent in 2008, still significantly lower than graduation rates for white women, at 45.8 percent. Sheli C. DeLaney received her master’s degree in Cultural Anthropology from the University of Cincinnati. Outside of work, she likes to play the flute, garden, and volunteer as a Spanish/English interpreter at a local free clinic.

Latinx cultural values can trigger mental health issues in the lives of Latinx women and cause them to underutilize mental health services as compared to the general population. About one in four Latina teenagers have thought about committing suicide, a rate higher than Latino teenage counterparts, according to Salud America!

Other factors may vary by state as well, such as the age and race/ethnicity of women. So, to compare breast cancer mortality , we need to look at mortality rates. To compare mortality in different populations, we need to look at mortality rates rather than the number of breast cancer deaths. So, although the number of breast cancer cases has increased over time, breast cancer rates were fairly stable. We expect the number of cases to increase over time because the population of the U.S. increases over time .

Additionally, the Latina population is increasingly becoming “primary wage earners and influencers” in the modern Hispanic United States Household. ACNN studyconducted the same year, however, found that 53% of Latinas get pregnant in their teens, about twice the national average. This number, while not reflecting the hypersexuality of Latina teens, can be attributed to intersecting social issues of gender, race, class, immigrant status and education.

Teenage Latinas are often met with pressure to meet these cultural standards, and this pressure can lead to development of anxiety and depression. These cultural factors do not favor reaching out for mental health assistance, making addressing the mental health concerns difficult. Despite this, many Latina women are finding their voice through mental health activism. Dior Vargas, a Latina feminist and mental health activists, created Color of My Mind, a collection of content from her People of Color Mental Health Phot Project. Using the art of photography, she gave POC with mental health issues a voice and successfully addressed the homogenized stereotypes about mental health problems, and stigmas in the communities of color.

As rich as the current data set is, individual interviews might have allowed for investigation of some topics at greater depth. The group setting may also have caused some participants to be less forthcoming on certain topics. For example, although all of the Latinas in this study expressed knowledge of instances of sexual harassment on the job, none acknowledged ever succumbing to unwanted advances. In addition, the two data collection sites used by this study, while widely separated geographically and contrasting sharply in terms of traditional and new settlement areas, are far from an exhaustive list all possible Latino immigrant settlement destinations.

Stratification by education and gender arose from prior research with Latino immigrants in the Cincinnati area. It was found that the cultural deference paid by Latinas to males and/or to better educated individuals often resulted in one or two individuals monopolizing the focus group discussion. Although there is a growing body of literature examining the work experiences of immigrants and of women, there is virtually nothing in the literature specifically addressing the needs of Latina immigrant workers. It has been suggested that Latina immigrant workers in the United States experience a “triple bind” of discrimination based upon an interlocking framework of race, gender, and socioeconomic status (Aguirre-Molina & Molina, 2003).

Other Words From Latina

As described below, we used 94 months of the presidency of Barack Obama to estimate counterfactual values of preterm births to Latina women during the 9 months beginning November 1, 2016, and ending July 31, 2017. The 2016 US presidential election appears to have been associated with an increase in preterm births among US Latina women. Anti-immigration policies have been proposed and enforced in the aftermath of the 2016 presidential election; future research should evaluate the association of these actions with population health. MSL values the women’s individual skills and acknowledges the women’s sharing, caring and helping roles in their family and community.

Comparatively, female business owners as a whole only increased by 20% during this same time period. These wage gaps in the workforce affect Latinas at every socioeconomic status, not just the working class. http://khalidabdulhamid.arablog.org/2020/02/07/just-how-to-choose-mexican-girls/ are the most likely group to be paid at or below the minimum wage, with 5.7% of wage and salary workers earning this amount.

The Legislative Day gives participants the opportunity to speak on behalf of their community and educate legislative staff about critical issues affecting families. For many women, this is the very first time that they go to Sacramento and meet with our legislators. Yes, the United States has come a long way since the days when women could not legally vote and were barred from legitimate employment – but the reminder of this wage gap demonstrates that our lawmakers still have much to do to ensure equality for all women in America.

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